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August 11, 2008

Comments

Stephen Douglas

Hi Bill,

I read your article on domain selling, and appraisals, and have some points to add:

1) Paypal accounts are essential for transactions in domain name sales. Paypal protects both the buyer and seller, and is basically acceptable up to the value of the limit Paypal gives you for your total account. In other words, you don't need an "escrow" service for domain sales less than what your Paypal account limit will hold. I've made hundreds of sales, from $10 - $5,000, and "guaranteed" my payments or my buyer's payments through the Paypal system. If something goes wrong, Paypal (owned by powerhouse eBay) will halt the payment, and try to resolve the issue before allowing the transaction to proceed. So essentially, Paypal is an acceptable escrow service for domain sales $5,000 and under.

2) Domain appraisals mean nothing really, other than getting a good idea on the minimum value of your domain. Usually, if your domain isn't less than 15 characters, clearly pronounceable, and generically descriptive, you're going to have to bet on some other "quality" the domain has, and that would be short, funny, unusual, memorable domains. Any domain with less than five letter characters is also a good bet. This is a new area of rabid buying. Watch out for alphanumerical domain mixes -- not usually considered valuable.

3) If you have a lot of domains, consider bulk appraisal or evaluation services. My company provides this for domain holders wanting appraisals on at least 500 domains or more, for only $5 per domain. I recommend an evaluation first, where we eliminate domains quickly for only $.50 per domain. We will remove the domains that we think don't have a profit life, and then if you choose, you can have the remaining domains appraised.

The one thing to remember about domain names is that even if the domain doesn't get typein traffic, and has no existing links, if it has a generic descriptive quality to it, you can have the domain built out very cheaply at a "content building" parking service, such as "http://www.Whypark.com". Nothing makes a domain owner happier than to see their domain resolve to a landing page that features 5+ relevant original articles regarding the domain's topic, and that their domain reaches a search engine indexed status within a month or two. That means that their domain, previously making nothing at a traditional parking service, can be built out to be found by users coming in from search engines, based on content provided by Whypark.com. The ability to provide your own ad feeds and CPA's on your domain's webpages at Whypark is also greatly beneficial to generating revenue. The fact that Whypark's standard package only charges a one-time $99 fee for 100 domains is remarkable.

It's always great to see an expert like yourself writing articles on the domain name business. We need more of these type of articles! Keep writing!

This is a good story on domain name sales. I hope my input helped add some good info for your readers!

B.K.Saravanan

Appraisals are just approximate estimates. The real price of domain name depends on the interest and need of the buyer. Did you know 770.com sold for 175,000 Euro.

Generally NNN dot com sale price is mid of $ xxxx US. Best method is to place that domain at a broker site with a minimum offer for the price asked by the buyer (or)you can keep it as reserve price and divert that buyer to broker site.

Domain brokerage site receives much more buyers and viewers, bidding on your domain gives a high price. you can also use escrow as payment gateway.

Do you know escrow fees is 3.25% (ordinary ) and 6.5 % with phone support. So you can ask the buyer to pay escrow. This is the normal practice followed. Try to sell your digital assets for Real Values

Regards,

BK

domain appraisal

Domain appraisals mean nothing really, other than getting a good idea on the minimum value of your domain. Usually, if your domain isn't less than 15 characters, clearly pronounceable, and generically descriptive, you're going to have to bet on some other "quality" the domain has, and that would be short, funny, unusual, memorable domains. Any domain with less than five letter characters is also a good bet. This is a new area of rabid buying. Watch out for alphanumerical domain mixes -- not usually considered valuable.

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  • Sweetmantra offers domain name strategy and advice, tips, and best practices by domain name expert and Internet marketing veteran Bill Sweetman. Topics covered include domain acquisition, domain brokering, domain buying, domain management, domain monetization, domain sales, new gTLDs, and premium domain names.

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